Biblical Meditation

Humility“Let the words of my mouth and the meditation of my heart
be acceptable in your sight, O Lord, my rock and my redeemer.”      Ps. 19:14 (ESV)

Chapter         (ESV)

Audio              (1:41)

As I have written previously, one of the unfortunate trends of our world today is shallow thinking. The contribution of the Internet to this phenomenon is captured well by Nicholas Carr in his book “The Shallows: What the Internet is Doing to Our Brains”.

As Christian healthcare professionals, we also run the risk of succumbing to shallow thinking in our professional and personal lives. I should know… all too often I have engaged in shallow thinking in my practice due to busyness and a desire for quick and easy answers. As an Ob/Gyn, I allowed shallow thinking to control my response to ethical issues such as in-vitro fertilization, sex selection of embryos, prenatal testing, and other issues.

The solution to the problem of shallow thinking is the subject of our next spiritual discipline…meditation. When people first hear or read the word meditation, they often think of eastern meditation. Eastern meditation is very different than Biblical meditation. Eastern meditation seeks to empty the mind.

Biblical meditation seeks to fill the mind with thoughts of God.

David writes here about the meditation of his heart.

When David practices Biblical meditation, he engages his mind and his emotions.

For David, meditation was thinking deeply about God and how to respond to God’s love.

For us in healthcare, Biblical meditation is necessary to develop a Biblical response to the ethical dilemmas we face in medicine. As Christian healthcare professionals, we should strive to respond to these dilemmas as God desires.

Biblical meditation allows us to spend time thinking deeply about what the bible has to say about various relevant topics. Yes, Biblical meditation will take some valuable time…but like the rest of the disciplines, the harvest from that time is rich and rewarding.

On Wednesday, I’ll write more about the “how” of meditation. In the meantime, try meditating on this verse from Eph. 1:3 “Blessed be the God and Father of our Lord Jesus Christ, who has blessed us in Christ with every spiritual blessing in the heavenly places…”.

Prayer: Lord, show me what you mean by my spiritual blessings in the heavenly places.

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One Response to Biblical Meditation

  1. Pingback: Biblical Meditation-2 | On Call- A devotional for physicians

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